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Sunday, March 18, 2012

Garmin handheld GPS comparison chart

Garmin handheld GPSThe Garmin handheld GPS comparison chart below shows all current Garmin backcountry and marine handhelds (in alphabetical order) that include a high-sensitivity chipset. I do not recommend any units without such chipsets for backcountry use.

Links go to my Garmin handheld GPS review/resource pages for each model except where I’ve yet to post those; in that case the links go to the Garmin product page. Features in the headers are explained below the chart, while recently discontinued models are shown on a separate page. You might also find my handheld GPS buyers guide and specialty GPS buyers guides helpful. NEW: Click on column headers to sort chart.

Garmin handheld GPS comparison chart

Model Display
type
Display size Rated battery life (hrs) Weight with batt- eries Pre-loaded detailed maps Ability to add maps/ storage Accepts custom maps Elec- tronic compass Paper-
less
geo-
caching
Turn by turn Waypoints /Routes Trackpts. /Tracks Miscell-aneous Compare prices
Dakota 10 Color,
touch,
hi-res
1.43″ x 2.15″ 20 5.25 oz No 850 MB Yes No Yes Yes 1000/50
10K/200
Compare prices
Dakota 20 Color,
touch,
hi-res
1.43″ x 2.15″ 20 5.25 oz No microSD Yes 3-axis Yes Yes 1000/50
10K/200
Wireless data Compare prices
eTrex 10 Mono-
chrome
1.4″ x 1.7″ 25 5 oz No No No No Yes No 1000/50
10K/100

Compare prices

eTrex 20 Color,
hi-res
1.4″ x 1.7″ 25 5.25 oz No microSD Yes No Yes Yes 2000/200
10K/200

Compare prices

eTrex 30 Color,
hi-res
1.4″ x 1.7″ 25 5.25 oz No microSD Yes 3-axis Yes Yes 2000/200
10K/200
Wireless data
Compare prices

fenix Mono-
chrome
1.2″ x 0.2″ 50 2.9 oz No No No 3-axis Yes No 1000/50
10K/100

Compare prices

Foretrex 301 Mono-
chrome
1.4″ x 0.9″ 18 3.1 oz No No No No No No 500/20
10K/10
Compare prices
Foretrex 401 Mono-
chrome
1.4″ x 0.9″ 17 3.1 oz No No No 2-axis No No 500/20
10K/10
Wireless data Compare prices
GPS 72H Mono-
chrome
1.6″ x 2.2″ 18 7.7 oz No No No No No No 500/50
2K/10
Floats Compare prices
GPSMAP 62 Color 1.6″ x 2.2″ 20 9.2 oz No 1.7 GB Yes No Yes Yes 2000/200
10K/200
Compare prices
GPSMAP 62s Color 1.6″ x 2.2″ 20 9.2 oz No microSD Yes 3-axis Yes Yes 2000/200
10K/200
Compare prices
GPSMAP 62st Color 1.6″ x 2.2″ 20 9.2 oz Yes microSD Yes 3-axis Yes Yes 2000/200
10K/200
Compare prices
GPSMAP 62sc Color 1.6″ x 2.2″ 16 9.3 oz No microSD Yes 3-axis Yes Yes 2000/200
10K/200
Camera
Compare prices

GPSMAP 62stc Color 1.6″ x 2.2″ 16 9.3 oz Yes microSD Yes 3-axis Yes Yes 2000/200
10K/200
Camera
Compare prices
GPSMAP 64s Color 1.43″ x 2.15″ 16 9.2 oz No microSD Yes 3-axis Yes Yes 5000/200
10K/200
GLONASS Compare at Amazon
GPSMAP 78 Color 1.6″ x 2.2″ 20 7.7 oz No microSD Yes No Yes Yes 2000/200
10K/200
Floats
Compare prices


GPSMAP 78s Color 1.6″ x 2.2″ 20 7.7 oz No microSD Yes 3-axis Yes Yes 2000/200
10K/200
Floats Compare prices
Montana 600 Color,
touch,
hi-res
2″ x 3.5″ 16/22 10.2 oz/11.7 oz No microSD Yes 3-axis Yes Yes 4000/200
10K/200
Wireless data,
Screen rotates,
nuvi mode

Compare prices

Montana 650 Color,
touch,
hi-res
2″ x 3.5″ 16/22 10.2 oz/11.7 oz No microSD Yes 3-axis Yes Yes 4000/200
10K/200
Wireless data,
Screen rotates,
nuvi mode,
camera

Compare prices

Montana 650t Color,
touch,
hi-res
2″ x 3.5″ 16/22 11.7 oz/13.2 oz Yes microSD Yes 3-axis Yes Yes 4000/200
10K/200
Wireless data,
Screen rotates,
nuvi mode,
camera

Compare prices

Monterra Color,
touch,
hi-res
2″ x 3.5″ 16/22 10.2 oz/11.7 oz Varies microSD Yes 3-axis Yes Yes 4000/200
10K/200
Android-based,
wireless data,
screen rotates,
nuvi mode,
camera
Compare at Amazon
Oregon 450 Color,
touch,
hi-res
1.53″ x 2.55″ 16 6.8 oz No microSD Yes 3-axis Yes Yes 2000/200
10K/200
Wireless data Compare prices
Oregon 450t Color,
touch,
hi-res
1.53″ x 2.55″ 16 6.8 oz Topo microSD Yes 3-axis Yes Yes 2000/200
10K/200
Wireless data Compare prices
Oregon 550 Color,
touch,
hi-res
1.53″ x 2.55″ 16 6.8 oz No microSD Yes 3-axis Yes Yes 2000/200
10K/200
Camera, Wireless data Compare prices
Oregon 550t Color,
touch,
hi-res
1.53″ x 2.55″ 16 6.8 oz Topo microSD Yes 3-axis Yes Yes 2000/200
10K/200
Camera, Wireless data Compare prices
Oregon 600 Capacitive,
color,
touch,
hi-res
1.5″ x 2.5″ 16 7.4 oz No microSD Yes 3-axis, auto Yes Yes 4000/200
10K/200
Camera, Wireless data Compare at Amazon
Oregon 650 Color,
touch,
hi-res
1.5″ x 2.5″ 16 7.4 oz No microSD Yes 3-axis, auto Yes Yes 4000/200
10K/200
Camera, Wireless data Compare at Amazon
Oregon 650t Color,
touch,
hi-res
1.5″ x 2.5″ 16 7.4 oz Topo microSD Yes 3-axis, auto Yes Yes 4000/200
10K/200
Camera, Wireless data Compare at Amazon
Rino 650 Color,
touch
1.43″ x 2.15″ 14 11.3 oz No microSD Yes 3-axis ? Yes 2000/200
10K/200
Two-way radio
Compare prices

Rino 655t Color,
touch
1.43″ x 2.15″ 14 11.3 oz Yes microSD Yes 3-axis ? Yes 2000/200
10K/200
Two-way radio
Compare prices

Feature explanations

  • Display type – Monochrome and older high resolution (hi-res) units tend to be more difficult to read in daylight conditions. Even so, the newer hi-res units are suitable for handheld use, where you will intuitively tilt the screen for the best view. They can also be customized to enhance viewing in bright conditions. The only “hi-res” units I recommend for fixed mount, non-external power use (e.g., bike handlebars) are the Dakota and Oregon 6xx series.
  • Ability to add maps/storage – If a unit accepts maps, the storage medium or available internal memory is listed. Units with pre-loaded detailed maps also offer some internal storage, in addition to SD/microSD. Please note that there are lots of free maps available for these units.
  • Accepts custom maps – These units can accept custom raster maps and Garmin BirdsEye imagery.
  • Electronic compass – These units also have a barometric altimeter. You can read more about electronic compasses here. A two-axis compass must be held level; a three-axis (AKA tri-axial) compass does not need to be held level, but is more of a pain to calibrate. Units listed as auto generally do not need calibration.
  • Paperless geocaching – These units will display the full geocache description, cache size, difficulty and terrain ratings, and recent logs.
  • Turn by turn – These units can give turn-by-turn highway directions when the proper maps (usually City Navigator) are added, making them effective dual-use units.
  • Waypoints/Routes and Trackpoints/Tracks – The numbers listed are the number of waypoints and routes that can be saved, followed by the tracklog capacity and number of tracks that can be saved.
  • Miscellaneous – Wireless data refers to these unit’s ability to transfer data wirelessly with other compatible Garmin units. You can transfer waypoints, tracks, routes and geocache summaries (paperless caching details cannot be transferred).

Return to chart

Comments

  1. Looking for a new (and improved) GPS primarily for Geocaching but I do camp, hike, hunt, Jeep as well. I have been using an old original yellow Garmin eTrex for geocacing has always worked well but tired of limited data entry and printing all teh paper work prior to a camping trip paperless sounds like the way to go. I also have Garmin Nuvi 205 & 780 units but not sure how wel they’d work for geocaching (haven’t tried them) and have used teh explorist 400 for hunting. From what I’ve read it seems like the Dakota 20 or Oregon 450 would be ideal for geocaching but man am I getting a collection of GPS units :-) (not even including the factory ones in my SUV and JEEP).
    Thanks for your thought/insights.
    Steve

    • Follow-up — I’m also likely going to be upgraing by cell phone to either an Android or iPhone4 in the near future which will of course also have GPS capabilities any geocaching integration?
      Steve

      • Yes, there are geocaching apps for both.

      • I use an iPhone and Ipad along with a Garmin Dakota 20….

        The Iphone/iPad app is awesome!! I can search from any location and find a cach and then immediately update my logs so when I get home everything is there. The only thing is that it isn’t quite as accurate as the garmin…. Unfortunately you have to download all of the locations before you head out on the Garmin- Not good for spontaneity!! The iPhone/iPad has much better maps features etc…. I say if you own one already, buy the app, much cheaper and way way way more functionality. It will still get you to the location but sometimes you have to walk around a little until the device becomes accurate (within 20-30 feet). The garmin will take you right there but like I said, definitely has it’s minuses (but is water and kid proof!!)……

    • Welcome to the club (GPS collectors)! You can use a nuvi in conjunction with the eTrex for paperless caching (http://geocaching.totaltechworld.com/). But a new unit would be ideal. The Oregon 450 is an excellent unit. I’ve heard of a few broken Dakotas and have the feeling that the Oregon is a little sturdier.

  2. Godfrey Obura says:

    Is Garmin 78s a differential GPS?

  3. Robert Brokaw says:

    I want a unit like the Garmin etrac Vista that can be used with a MAC.

  4. All of Garmin’s devices can be used with the Mac. Just download their free Basecamp program here: http://www8.garmin.com/macosx/index.jsp

    At that same link you will also find Webupdater (used to update the firmware on your GPS) and Communicator which is used for other things such as registering a new GPS.

    Garmin also has a tech support forum for Mac users here: https://forums.garmin.com/forumdisplay.php?f=167

  5. Great deal at REI on Garmin Oregon 450. $250! With the $50 rebate, that brings the total price down to $200.

    jrs

  6. Wow-great site, even for me who has zero experience with hand held GPS! I am looking for a unit for my husband’s birthday. He has no experience with hand held, either and gets easily frustrated with electronic devices, so it will need to be instinctive. He is not a person to go searching around the internet to do alot of downloads, upgrades etc. (he will ask me to do it and I would rather eat nails)

    He’s 55 and hunts in Maine north woods and hopefully we will also be traveling to the Grand Canyon, Ireland and Yosemite in the next 18 months.

    Thanks so much for any ideas-simple would be good, but as many free pre-loads as possible!

  7. I am looking for a simple gps for trail riding (we just want to be able to find our way back to camp).Bass Pro has a Venture HC on sale and I have a friend that works for Garmin that can get me the eTrex at a great price. Would either of those work for me?

  8. I am looking for a simple gps for trail riding (we just want to be able to find our way back to camp).Bass Pro has a Venture HC on sale and I have a friend that works for Garmin that can get me the eTrex 30 at a great price. Would either of those work for me?

  9. I am looking for a gps that would be good for hunting. My husband has been looking into hunting new timber and i think he needs it to find his way out easier :) I was wondering if the venture would be a good one to get him and I was wondering if it’s possible to get topo maps on it. I have zero experience with these things, but he’s mentioned wanting one.

  10. I’ve had a GPS 12 forever and have really enjoyed it. It does all I need it to and still works great (I use it for hunting), but I understand Garmin no longer supports it (no surprise in view of its age). What to replace it with?

    An Etrex Legend H was recently recommended (much less expensive than the hundreds I paid for the original unit). I tried it and am very disappointed: poor graphics, too many steps to accomplish the very simple task of marking waypoints, finding them, and navigating to them. Maybe I’ve just not learned enough about it to simplify the effort, but, even if I did, I don’t think that would improve the graphics. This device just has too many features that I don’t need, and I am paying for them with an overly complex device.

    Suggestions?

    Just sign me: Simple

    • If you find the Legend H too complex, I’m not sure what to recommend. The new eTrex 10 and 20 offer an improved interface, and the eTrex 20 should have better graphics, but it has even more features than the Legend H.

      On the Legend H, you press and hold the front rocker key to mark a waypoint. Then you can press and hold the Menu button to choose a waypoint to navigate to.

  11. Travis Deabay says:

    Hi,

    Great information…I am looking into an eTrex 20 mainly for use for fishing and hiking, but also want to have turn by turn in the cities. Does this come standard or do you have to purchase the update for sixty dollars in order to have it?

    Thank You.

  12. Any way to add a column, footnote, or something to show which models count geocaches and a separate kind of data, and how many each of those models will hold?

    • What are you looking for besides how many caches they will hold? And does Garmin always make that public with each model?

      • Ay, there’s the rub. Garmin publishes a number of “waypoints” that each model will hold. But on the newer models (Dakota, Oregon, Montana, eTrex x0, etc) “geocaches’ go into their own storage and have a different and separate limit that doesn’t count against the waypoint limit.

        It;s mentioned in some of Garmin’s FAQs and a few other places online, but I’m looking for a chart like your that lists all of them side by side instead of running around to multiple sources trying to find for each model.

      • I posed the question in an email to Garmin tech support, specifically about the eTrex 10/20/30 models, and here was the reply:

        “The eTrex 20 and 30 can hold up to 5,000 geocaches. The eTrex 10 can hold up to 2,000 geocaches. The thing to remember is all three devices have a limitation of the number of gpx files. When you load a geocaches one at a time, then this will create a gpx file. However, when you load a pocket query to the device, you will be able to put in a large number of geocaches that only use one gpx file. The gpx limitation for the 20/30 is 2,000 while the eTrex 10 is 500.”

        Using the eTrex 10 as my example, I think that means I can have up to 500 caches in a single GPX file, but I can have multiple GPX files that will load at startup to reach the maximum of 2000 geocaches.

        I’m going to test this later — but does my interpretation make sense?

        • Or it means you can have up to 500 .gpx files.

          • Yeah. you’re right. I just thought it was written oddly and my previous testing of the eTrex 10 had it running out of memory when I tried to load a GPX with over 500 waypoints or so.

            I think the real problem (specific to the eTrex 10) is the limited size of the mass storage area. Stripped of everything but system files, it has about 6MB of free space. In use I’ve had the thing complain about being low on memory when I’ve only used about 1/2 of that disk space — so either the GPS wants to reserve some of it for it’s own use, or there are other limits on internal memory besides than the mass-storage device.

            It’d be awfully hard 2000 caches (whether in one or 500 individual files) to fit in that space unless they all had short descriptions and no logs.

  13. Great reviews and very useful information. I would like to see screen resolution listed in the comparison chart as well – possible?

    Regards, Niklas

  14. Может кто -нибудь подскажет как очистить экран от маршрутных точек(не удаляя из памяти)?ETREX 10

  15. The Oregon 550t may be great but you can’t download from a Mac. Factory doesn’t know when or if the bug will be fixed.

  16. Есть еще вопрос – когда идет навигация по треку(заранее написанному) стрелка компаса стоит вертикально при правильном прохождении.Но если я ухожу с трека далеко в сторону – куда указывает стрелка?Я думал к ближайшей точке трека,но это не так.eTrex10.

  17. After a couple months of searching for the perfect geocaching GPS, I’m still unsure. I thought I had narrowed it down to the Oregon 450 (descent price, touch screen, 3 axis, 3D maps, etc), but then my green-conscious mind saw that it can’t be recharged, and so I’d have to constantly use batteries. How long will rechargeable batteries last? Or is there another similar model that can be charged via cable?

  18. Jonathan Lebaron says:

    Hello lots of information much appreciated.
    I have been using an etrex venture hc for the last few years and the most important thing I am looking for is accuracy on position. I am sort of doing surveys of small farms and was wondering if there was some beter device for the job without getting into the thousands of dollar units.
    Thank you for any ideas on this question.

    • Generally speaking no. The one that might be better is the new eTrex 20 or 30, which uses GLONASS + GPS. But it’s a new unit and the firmware isn’t mature. Six months or a year down the road, it could be a bit more accurate than the Venture HC though.

  19. mattiboy says:

    hello all thanks for the excellent intel, i am a total outdoors offroad kind of person i guess you can say, i hike i bike i buggy, ride motorcycles, snowboard, snowshoe, jet ski and boat in various places and am fairly tech savy but not like programmer status i have been looking at the etrex 30 and beleive it is the best choice for me am i correct? and can i load trail maps for biking, hiking, and riding onto an sd card or internal memory?

  20. Jeff Jensen says:

    Hello all,
    I am looking to purchase my first GPS unit for hiking and some backpacking. I have been considering the Garmin Foretrex 301, but after discovering this website and its information on the eTrex Venture, I am considering both. While the Venture has a color screen, what are the other primary differences that should be considered when comparing these two units, and would you recommend one over the other or are they fairly comparable?

    Thanks!

    • You can’t load maps to the Foretrex, so that should probably be a consideration. The Venture is an older model which has been replaced by the Venture HC, which should serve your purposes well. Still, if you can swing it, I’d go for the eTrex 20, which adds the new features listed here…

      http://gpstracklog.com/2011/04/five-reasons-to-upgrade-your-garmin-handheld.html

      Regardless of what you get, handheld GPS are complex and have quite the learning curve, so you may want to read this series…

      http://gpstracklog.com/category/handheld-sport-gps/handheld-gps-101

      • Jeff Jensen says:

        Thank you for your timely response and the valuable information you provided! I did mean to indicate it was the newer, Venture HC I was considering, though I was unaware that you could not load maps onto the Foretrex. That may be a dealbreaker. I hadn’t researched the eTrex 20 yet and will spend some time this weekend reading up on it. It seems that your consensus is the eTrex 20 would be the unit of choice amongst all those we have discussed. I think this may be the lucky product on which I will use my REI 20% off coupon.

  21. Roc in SC says:

    I’m going to be hunting public wildlife management land. Some range from 2,000 and 10,000 acre tracts and Francis marion National Forest is close to 250,000 acres. I’m not completly tech-phobic but prefer simplicity. Would an Etrex 20 or 30 give me with the ability to view/add maps, sat images and save hundreds of points of interest… stuff like stand locations, rubs, etc… Does the slighly larger screen of an Oregon series matter? Not sure I would have a use of all the maps in the Oregon t series vs the non-t. Assume non-t units are more custum-izable? (Google maps images etc…)The light weight of the Etrex attracts me. The multiple screen touch screen nature of the Oregon isn’t a deal killer, but the lightweight and cost of the etrex is attractive. Any guidence or opinions appreciated.

    • Yes, the eTrex 20 and 30 will do all those things.

      A disadvantage of the eTrex, other than the small screen, is that entering waypoint names is slower than on the Oregon. With the eTrex, you’ll use a click-stick to do it. But the Oregon has a less visible screen in certain conditions.

      No need to get a t unit with preloaded 100K scale maps when there are plenty of free 24K scale maps available from http://gpsfiledepot.com.

      Putting Google Maps images on any would be a pain. You’re better off paying $30 for BirdsEye satellite imagery or topo maps.

  22. Roc in SC says:

    Went with the Etrex 20. Couldn’t resist the price with a discount gotten thru Amazon. It felt good in hand, and I feel the computer/software will be beneficial and do most of the work I need. Looking forward to this weekend.

  23. Paul Newson says:

    Hello all
    Just over 2 years ago I purchased a Garmin 60CSx from the Bangkok distributor, as did several of my associates. The problem that is occurring to our units is that they become difficult to turn off and require the batteries to be removed to do so. My unit then became difficult to turn on, now it will not turn on at all.
    I returning my unit to the Garmin agent where it was purchased (30,000baht almost $,1000) they advised that this was a common problem with this model and it would be cheaper to buy a new model considering freight cost from Thailand to Taiwan and the repair costs themselves and a possible turn around time of 6 months.
    Has any other person experienced this problem and is there an economical way around this problem, like buying new components and fitting them myself???
    If all is lost what recommendations are there for a unit to use in Thailand that is portable easy to read and good for on and off road.
    Paul (bitter and twisted)

  24. is there any way to rotate the screen in the 76cx? With my old Garmin III and V we could rotate the screen, so we could mount the gps on motorcycle handlebars horizontally instead of vertical, up and down. Want to do same for 76cx.
    Thanks, Steve

    • Afraid not.

      • hi again, okay the 76cx you can’t rotate the screen. Can it be done with the eTrex 20 or 30? Looking to upgrade from my old Garmin V. Do off road m.c. ventures, group rides where the organizers have a route that can be downloaded onto our gps. Can that be done with the 76cx and the various eTrex? I’m not doing geo caching at all. Also use a 205 on my mtn bike and road bike. Looks like the eTrex might be good for the bicycles, yes? Smaller screen than 76, but smaller size in general might be good for not hooking branches. Thanks, Steve

        • AFAIK, the only current Garmin handheld with a rotatable screen is the high-end Montana series.

          The new eTrex x0 series is good for bikes, but I prefer the 62s, which seems to be a bit more user friendly due to button placement.

  25. I am looking for a handheld gps to verify mining claim locations and want it to be fairly accurate…. and property lines for small parcels to remark and update
    I am looking at the Montana series with the high resolution/color screen …. what would you recommend?
    Would get the model without the maps downloaded already… but has lots of waypoints and tracking pts, routes, etc.
    Is there a better one for surveying ??
    Thanks,
    Russ

    • First of all, be aware that consumer GPS will only give you accuracy of 10-30′ (possibly worse in steep terrain/canyons). The Montana would be nice for its touchscreen and ease of entering waypoints. The new eTrex 20/30 offer GLONASS + GPS support which could theoretically improve accuracy, but they aren’t touchscreen devices.

  26. Does anyone know who makes the best gps for making maps? i want to make an accurate map of 300 acres (boundary) and trails within. The land is all forested, so i need to know which is the most sensitive with tree cover. In the end, I want to be able to get this map to a web site and make high quality prints of it. thanks in advance for your advise.
    Douglas

    • Consumer GPS are accurate to anywhere from 10-30′ usually. The satellite constellation isn’t geosynchronous, so there are good days and bad days. You can use an online GPS constellation prediction tool to find better days.

      While any receiver with a high-sensitivity chipset should work fine, you might want to look at the new eTrex 20 or 30, which include GPS + GLONASS, which could improve things a bit and get you closer to 10′ accuracy.

  27. What are your top three for just geocaching?
    Low, medium, and high priced.
    If you could buy one to go geocaching without looking at price what one would you pick??

  28. Scott Crosby says:

    What I’d like to know is which Garmin model can be used to transfer point shapefiles from Arc Map 10.1 to the GPS unit, and vica-versa. What I’m looking for is a unit around $200, where I can transfer tracks and points back and forth between Arc Map and the GPS receiver, via DNR GPS (formerly DNR Garmin: http://www.dnr.state.mn.us/mis/gis/tools/arcview/extensions/DNRGarmin/DNRGarmin.html). I’ve used Basecamp, but I can’t remember if Basecamp’s file saving format is compatible with Arc Map shapefiles.

  29. Jonathan says:

    I’ve been using an eTrex Legend for a number of years for backcountry hiking and find it’s great when I’m not a forest.. However, as soon as I get into the trees, even when they’re not thick, the Legend has trouble (status reads:”Weak Signal, need clear view of sky”). Unfortunately there aren’t a lot of trails in Ontario, Canada that don’t go through some sort of forest. :-(

    Has technology advanced enough to overcome this? Is the GPS sensitivity and/or accuracy better on the new eTrex models (10/20/30) compared to the older eTrex Legend? Is it worth upgrading?

    Thanks in advance,

    Jonathan

  30. I work Search and Rescue and am debating between the Montana 650 and the Rino 650. Seeing the map while snowmobiling in tough conditions is important (I wear reading glasses) as well as good lighting after dark. Weight isn’t the biggest issue, but detailed topo maps are a must. Any suggestions, I don’t see a huge difference, but then again I’m used to my Rino 120, so wanted to ask.

  31. frank centa says:

    I am using a gps 72H for sailing. I go around routes that I have programmed in and want the gps to show the next waypoint when I have got to APPROXIMATLY the current waypoint. My question, what is the radius within which one must get before the gps registers that you have arrived, and is this adjustable? I would like it to go to the next waypoint when I am within about 100m of the current waypoint.

  32. What is the main difference between the Garmin etrex 20 and etrex30. I’m looking to purchase one for my husband for hunting purposes only (and for limited time as well). Thanks

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